10 Best Bushcraft Knives

Bushcraft knives are great all-around knives that are durable and strong, and they are good for fire craft as well as woodworking. They are needed to help start fires and gather firewood. They should also be able to protect you if you find yourself under attack from a wild animal. Finally, you need to use them to help you prepare your food. Take a look at our top picks for bushcraft knives on the market today.

1. Spyderco Bushcraft G-10

Spyderco is a company that is known for its attention to detail, and it shows in the Spyderco Bushcraft G-10 knife. This knife comes from a collaboration between Tactical Bushcrafter Chris Claycombe, BushcraftUK.com, and Spyderco Designs.

The Bushcraft G-10 has a Scandi Grind with a 4.1-inch blade that is made of O1 steel and an edge length of 3.938 inches. It is 8.75 inches long, and it weighs 7.8 ounces. This knife is not very heavy, and it is convenient to take with you when you are getting back in touch with nature.

The handle is made of G-10, and it grips well. It has a lanyard hole in the bottom, and a well made leather sheath with a plastic cap for the tip of the knife. These features are useful because you can run a rope through the lanyard and keep your knife right by you at all times.

This knife works well for a variety of tasks, and it will hold up to use well. It excels at slicing and making delicate cuts. It is full tang and incredibly durable with an ergonomic handle. Spyderco products are known for their ability to last a long time, and this knife performs a number of functions well.

This knife was made for survival and tactical activities, and it is an ideal choice for many users. It is one of the best bushcraft knives out there. When you are surviving off the land, a knife is the most important tool you have. You need to make sure that it is versatile and can perform a number of different functions, as this one can.

Pros

  • O1 steel gives you a very sharp blade
  • Holds edge well
  • Full tang
  • High durability
  • Great handle ergonomics

Cons

  • Blade requires maintenance to prevent rusting
  • Not great for batoning longer wood
  • Expensive
  • Blade is short

2. Helle Temagami Carbon Knife

This is a very attractive bushcraft knife that is very lightweight at just three ounces. The blade is 4.33 inches of laminated triple-layered stainless steel with a flat grind, and it is incredibly sharp. The edge is well made and easy to sharpen as necessary. It has a semi-full tang for extra strength.

The handle is a 4.41-inch leather and curly birch handle, and it is comfortable and easy to grip. The knife is stable in your hand, and it has a finger guard for added protection from the sharp blade. It has a fixed blade with a straight forward positive angle for increased cutting power, it sweeps to the tip for control. The drop point and the forward positive angle are great for gutting fish.

This knife is best suited for refined skills such as carving and preparing food, and it is not as well suited for building traps. It does come with a Scandinavian style pouch sheath that holds it securely. It is made in Norway, and it is a very attractive design.

Pros

  • Triple layered laminated stainless steel blade
  • Comes with custom full grain leather sheath
  • Attractive design
  • Handmade
  • Lightweight at three ounces
  • Finger guard
  • Durable and strong

 

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Can chip
  • Can rust

3. Fallkniven F1 Bushcraft Knife

This bushcraft knife was originally made for the Swedish army, and it is very durable. Although it isn’t full tang, it is plenty tough. It is 3¾ inches long, and it is light and safe to use. The sure-grip thermorun handle is comfortable and easy to maneuver.

The steel blade is a drop point VG-10 stainless steel with a satin finish and a full convex grind, and it includes a black zytel sheath. This knife is well proportioned and very versatile, and it works great for a number of daily tasks. It is 8.3 inches long and weighs just six ounces, and it has a thick blade at 4.5 mm, so it functions as a larger knife.

This knife is made of tough stainless steel, and it holds up well in cutting both wood and meat. The handle almost completely encases the tang, but the part that sticks out is great for hammering. The construction is both simple and solid, and it is comfortable to use. It is one of the best bushcraft knives on the market today.

Pros

  • VG steel blade
  • Handle material is made of lightweight thermoplastic (thermorum)
  • Full tang construction
  • Grip holds well
  • Convex grind

Cons

  • Handle is small for people with big hands

4. Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Companion Bushcraft Knife

The Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Companion bushcraft knife is on par with the quality of other Ka-Bar knives. It has a full tang blade that is heavy duty and well suited for almost any task you need it to do. It is 10 5/8 inches long with a 5¼ inch black, and it weighs 16 ounces making it on the heavier side for a knife.

The blade is .25 inches thick and made of high carbon steel. It has a drop point profile, and the blade has a full flat grind. In addition to carving, skinning, and splitting wood, it can also chop because it is stronger than other bushcraft knives. This is a tough bushcraft knife that serves a lot of purposes, and the handle material is a basic design made of zytel (high-density plastic). 

Overall, this bushcraft knife has a simple design, but it is very functional. It is sturdy and comfortable and it can perform a lot of different functions well. It is another one of the better bushcraft knives on the market.

Pros

  • Well made and heavy duty
  • Versatile and performs a number of tasks
  • Affordable
  • Quality hardshell sheath
  • 1095 carbon steel blade
  • Safety features

Cons

  • Must remove belt to attach sheath
  • Powder coating may wear off blade
  • Doesn’t excel at any one task